Stuffing my pig face with the vinegary slaw, this too was a fantastic bite. But I did my best to suss out some representative examples at each stall, as starting points for further exploration. So if you’re there to try a lot of things, this is definitely meal-in-a-bowl-sized by itself. Which is no doubt why my 2016 guide to this food court has been one of Fooditor’s most steadily popular posts since it was published in the fall. About / Contact Us | Subscribe to Newsletter | Copyright © Fooditor 2020. Imagine a totally awesome, delectable strip of chicken fried to crispy crunchy perfection that tastes like Chinese food. | Website Design by Kenton Web Design, INTRODUCING CHICAGO’S FIRST FESTIVAL OF STRANGE FOODS, TRAVELING TO CHINA FOR DUCK DUCK GOAT WITH STEPHANIE IZARD, THE FOODITOR GUIDE TO BIRRIA ON CHICAGO’S SOUTHWEST SIDE, 19 PAUL, BARBECUE IN PROGRESS IN MORGAN PARK. Simple as could be, but this was one of my favorite bites. This is a delicate, sophisticated dish that made me think of fine dining versions of chicken like the $75 sous vide chicken at NoMI or the chicken salad portion of the $55 chicken entree at the Roister—though it’s rather more of a deal than those, at $3.95. And they’re great! Really heavy, like eating a box of aluminum foil heavy. A new stand, open since January (in the former Qing Xiang Yuan Dumplings spot), Tientsin Restaurant was the first one I went to which made clear where its owners are from—Tientsin, more commonly called Tianjin, a major port and industrial center whose name you may have seen on containers and rail cars. Tientsin Restaurant was the first one I went to which made clear where its owners are from—Tientsin, more commonly called Tianjin, a major port and industrial center whose name you may have seen on containers and rail cars. Under the right circumstances morbid curiosity could have gotten me to try the burger in a place like this, but on my first visit for this article I stuck with trying to get one of the more obviously Chinese items, soup dumplings, which were advertised on a paper sign on the wall. The menu seems to have something of everything—marinated squid, chicken feet with pickled peppers, tofu hotpot, an assortment of grilled skewers, and various dumplings, one type of which was sitting on the counter. It was pretty good, though obviously a bit impractical as a lunch. Sussex Centre Food Court, 401 Sussex Street, Chinatown. Instead there are three new stalls, all of them worth checking out. They may not be precisely xiao long bao (and they certainly don’t photograph as prettily), but they’re awfully close in flavor, and very good. 09/03/2017 Daisy D. The other, the soup stand Yummy Yummy Noodles, has graduated to a full restaurant at 24th and Wentworth. The chicken wings could have come from a Tyson freezer bag for all I know, but fried and dusted with the togarashi-like pepper blend that all these places use, they were excellent—plus, with the skewers running through them, I was able to tell my sons they were fried bats. The food court has lacked a youth-oriented snack shop since the departure of (no great loss) Grill’N’Chill Cafe, so the arrival of this Taiwanese bubble tea shop with a short list of snacks fills an obvious niche—though don’t expect fruity bubble drinks; they’re serious about everything being a tea-focused drink, with maybe another flavoring worked in. I think what I got was more like the safe choice for gringos than the most interesting choice, but I wound up with a nice looking bowl of beef noodle soup—that is, a little beef in chicken broth with thick udon-like noodles and a few greens. The Maxwell Road Food Court is a must visit for foodies in Singapore. On my next visit I decided to try to improve my odds, ordering the braised brisket soup with rice noodles. And for $10, I got a freshly-braised ham hock, giving off wafts of pork and star anise, neatly chopped by hand and coated with a spicy-sweet sauce. Text and photos by The okonomiyaki, a kind of seafood and vegetable pancake likewise drizzled with mayo and a sweet sauce, is quite good. I CAN’T HEAR YOU! The vegetable pancakes turned out to have a brittle shell of a wrapper, filled with what looked like one of those Asian mystery greens that always gets called “water spinach,” plus egg and cellophane noodles. //